Hikers3

100 Ways To Live A Better Life – 61. Go Hiking

Do it for at least one week-end. Nature is more powerful than our human created environment. We don?t know how to channel the energy into our artificial habitats. If you want to recharge, go outside and stay in connection with the wilderness.

Our modern artificial world is still very young, only a few thousands years. Compared with millions of years spent by nature to make the mountains, oceans or forests is practically nothing.

Don?t take for granted that our artificial environment is suitable for you, because,most of the time, it isn?t. Go find your real roots, connect with your true nature and accept the fact that you?re functioning in a much larger areal.

Hiking is a very clean way to appropriately wash your brain in the good sense. A clean brain is a happy brain. 

The Go Hiking Guide For The Busy Guys

One of the most interesting short stories about Buddhist goes like this: “Lama, you say that we should meditate at least 1 hour per day. But what if I am a very busy person? Well, lama answered: if you’re busy, then you should meditate twice as much.”

It’s the same with hiking: if you use your lack of time as an excuse, then you should hike twice as much.

But how?

Well, let me try a few quick tips that might help you. Please keep in mind that, to a certain extent, I’m guilty for not hiking as well, but my recent penchant for running (and ultra-running) changed this for the better. For instance, last year I ran my first mountain semi-marathon, spending a few hours in one of the most beautiful sceneries in the world. Also, even when I’m not racing in a competition, during a normal week, that is, I’m still spending at least 10-20 hours in a park, usually running.

Nevertheless, the tips below should serve you well regardless of your fitness plans.

1. Too Busy For Mountains? Use Parks

Like I said, that’s what I do lately. I can’t always go to the mountains or to the sea, but I do have a few big parks very close to me.  They’re all within walking distance, and even if I’m not training, I go for a short walk just to clear my head, or to enjoy the fresh air.

2. Use Hiking As A Retreat For More Work

I used to this when I had the online publishing company and I think the name for this was “teambuilding”. When we afforded it, we took a few cars and went to the mountains for an entire weekend, continuing some of the work up there, and for the rest of the time enjoying the scenery or playing social games. The nice thing about this is that you won’t perceive work as, you know, “work”.

3. Find A Group

Don’t go alone, try to join a group. It might be a specialized group for hiking, or just some friends of yours, converted to this new passion. the thing with groups is that they tend to create a much bigger energy. Also, there is higher degree of probability: there is always somebody else willing to help out, to replace missing things or just to help out.

4. Set A Goal

This might be a number of miles you want to walk, or just a number of days you want to spend in nature. For instance: by the end of 2015, I want to have walked at least 2015 miles in the mountains. Or: I want to spend at least 5 weeks in the mountains, out of the 53 weeks that this year will have. It will help with motivation.

While the tips above are not strictly related to hiking (you can use them for pretty much any activity you want) they may help. And, in the end, if they make you spend even one days more in nature, I’ll be pretty happy. 🙂

further reading

The Story Of My First Mountain Semi-Marathon

The Mud Race



Running For My Life - from zero to ultramarathoner


The spooky thing about depression is that it sneaks in. There aren’t really trumpets and loud voices announcing: “Hail, hail, this is depression entering the room, all rise!” Nope. It’s slow, silent, creepy. It doesn’t even look like depression. It starts with small isolation thoughts like: “Maybe I shouldn’t get out today, I just don’t feel like going out”. And then it does the same next day. And then the day after that and so on. And then it starts to whisper louder and louder in your ears: “Why would you go outside, you loser? Didn’t have enough yet? Want more people to make fun of how much of a big, fat loser you are?”

And then you start to breath in guilt and shame, instead of air. Every breathe you take is putting more dark thoughts into your body.

Until you get stuck. You can’t move anymore. At all.

If you want to know how I got out of this space, eventually, check out my latest book on Amazon and Kindle.

Running For My Life -from zero to ultramarathoner

Dragos Roua

The guy who started all this. Entrepreneur, ultra-marathoner, tanguero, father and risk taker. I'm blogging here, but I also spend a lot of time in this marvelous space.. You're invited, by the way.

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